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Ceremony in Death by J.D. Robb Read Online (FREE)

Ceremony in Death Read Online

Read Ceremony in Death (In Death, #5) by J.D. Robb full novel online free here.

There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, Than are dreamt of in your philosophy.– Shakespeare

We may not pay Satan reverence, for that would be indiscreet, but we can at least respect his talents. — Mark Twain

 

CHAPTER ONE

Death surrounded her. She faced it daily, dreamed of it nightly. Lived with it always. She knew its sounds, its scents, even its texture. She could look it in its dark and clever eye without a flinch. Death was a tricky foe, she knew. One flinch, one blink, and it could shift, it could change. It could win.

Ten years as a cop hadn’t hardened her toward it. A decade on the force hadn’t made her accept it. When she looked death in the eye, it was with the cold steel of the warrior.

Eve Dallas looked at death now. And she looked at one of her own.

Frank Wojinski had been a good cop, solid. Some would have said plodding. He’d been affable, she remembered. A man who hadn’t complained about the bilge disguised as food at the NYPSD Eatery, or the eye-searing paperwork the job generated. Or, Eve thought, about the fact that he’d been sixty-two and had never made it past the rank of detective sergeant.

He’d been on the pudgy side and had let his hair gray and thin naturally. It was a rare thing in 2058 for a man to bypass body sculpting and enhancements. Now, in his clear-sided view casket with its single spray of mournful lilies, he resembled a peacefully sleeping monk from an earlier time.

He’d been born in an earlier time, Eve mused, coming into the world at the end of one millennium and living his life in the next. He’d been through the Urban Wars, but hadn’t talked of them as so many of the older cops did. Frank hadn’t been one for war stories, she recalled. He was more likely to pass around the latest snapshot or hologram of his children and grandchildren.

He liked to tell bad jokes, talk sports, and had a weakness for soydogs with spiced pickle relish.

A family man, she thought, one who left behind great grief. Indeed, she could think of no one who had known Frank Wojinski who hadn’t loved him.

He had died with half his life still ahead of him, died alone, when the heart everyone had thought so huge and so strong had just stopped.

“Goddamn it.”

Eve turned, laid a hand on the arm of the man who stepped up beside her. “I’m sorry, Feeney.”

He shook his head, his droopy camel’s eyes filled with misery. With one hand he raked through his wiry red hair. “On the job would have been easier. I could handle line of duty. But to just stop. To just check out in his easy chair watching arena ball on the screen. It’s not right, Dallas. A man’s not supposed to stop living at his age.”