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Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds Read Online (FREE)

Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds Read Online

Read Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds online free here.

 

DON’T NOBODY

believe nothing

 

these days

 

which is why I haven’t

 

told nobody the story

 

I’m about to tell you.

 

And truth is,

 

you probably ain’t

 

gon’ believe it either

 

gon’ think I’m lying

 

or I’m losing it,

 

but I’m telling you,

 

this story is true.

 

It happened to me.

 

Really.

 

It did.

 

It so did.

 

 

MY NAME IS

Will.

 

William.

 

William Holloman.

 

But to my friends

 

and people

 

who know me

 

know me,

 

just Will.

 

So call me Will,

 

because after I tell you

 

what I’m about to tell you

 

you’ll either

 

want to be my friend

 

or not

 

want to be my friend

 

at all.

 

Either way,

 

you’ll know me

 

know me.

 

 

I’M ONLY WILLIAM

to my mother

 

and my brother, Shawn,

 

whenever he was trying

 

to be funny.

 

Now

 

I’m wishing I would’ve

 

laughed more

 

at his dumb jokes

 

because the day

 

before yesterday,

 

Shawn was shot

 

and killed.

 

 

I DON’T KNOW YOU,

don’t know

 

your last name,

 

if you got

 

brothers

 

or sisters

 

or mothers

 

or fathers

 

or cousins

 

that be like

 

brothers

 

and sisters

 

or aunties

 

or uncles

 

that be like

 

mothers

 

and fathers,

 

but if the blood

 

inside you is on the inside

 

of someone else,

 

you never want to

 

see it on the outside of

 

them.

 

 

THE SADNESS

is just so hard

 

to explain.

 

Imagine waking up

 

and someone,

 

a stranger,

 

got you strapped down,

 

got pliers shoved

 

into your mouth,

 

gripping a tooth

 

somewhere in the back,

 

one of the big

 

important ones,

 

and rips it out.

 

Imagine the knocking

 

in your head,

 

the pressure pushing

 

through your ears,

 

the blood pooling.

 

But the worst part,

 

the absolute worst part,

 

is the constant slipping

 

of your tongue

 

into the new empty space,

 

where you know

 

a tooth supposed to be

 

but ain’t no more.

 

 

IT’S SO HARD TO SAY,

Shawn’s

 

dead.

 

Shawn’s

 

dead.

 

Shawn’s

 

dead.

 

So strange to say.

 

So sad.

 

But I guess

 

not surprising,

 

which I guess is

 

even stranger,

 

and even sadder.

 

 

THE DAY BEFORE YESTERDAY

me and my friend Tony

 

were outside talking about

 

whether or not we’d get any

 

taller now that we were fifteen.

 

When Shawn was fifteen