Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Search in posts
Search in pages

The Perfect Roommate by Minka Kent Read Online (FREE)

Ooh. A “gated” neighborhood. How fancy.

That’s the thing about rich people, they feel the need to insert these little details so casually in conversation, as if you’ve forgotten for a moment that they have money. It’s a crutch, I think. A side effect of their insecurity. And it’s a damn shame, too. Lauren could be that much more likeable if only she didn’t feel the need to word vomit her privileged upbringing into every topic of conversation.

It’s almost as if she’s worried I won’t like her—which is hilarious. No one’s ever cared if I liked them.

“Anyway, I’ll let you get settled,” she says, turning to face me when we reach the end of the hall. “If you need any help with anything, I’ll be in my room.”

I smile and nod. It’s exhausting having to talk this much, having to smirk and laugh and be social and constantly engaged.

But at least it didn’t kill me.

Lauren disappears into her room, leaving the door open a crack. Soft, downtempo music plays a second later, the glow of her expensive, feather-light laptop filling her dark room. The sliver of light is like the tiniest peek into her world, and I must admit I’m curious—though I’m not sure why.

Heading out to my Honda to grab my things, I realize that I’ve parked behind her shiny black Lexus. We’ll have to talk parking spots and particulars later. But for now, I need to focus on getting these bags and bins out of my backseat and into my beautiful new place.

Lugging the first plastic tote in my arms a minute later, I return inside and trek down the hall to my well-appointed guest suite. Dropping it on the center of my bed, the top loosens and falls to the wooden floor with a plastic-y thump. Swiping it off the floor, I catch the hint of a white envelope sticking out from beneath the ruffled bed skirt.

Upon first glance, it appears to be an old bill of some kind, or maybe a credit card offer? The return address is too generic to tell. I place it on top of the chest in the corner with the intention of giving it to Lauren when my gaze falls on the name.

Emily Waterford.

I grab the envelope again, examining the address.

47 Magpie Drive.

And the date on the postage meter sticker.

December 17th of last year.

Only two months ago.

Lauren looked me in the eyes and told me she’d never had a roommate before, that her dire financial situation essentially began this semester.

Did she … lie?

God, I hope not. As hypocritical as it may be, if there’s anything in this world I can’t stand, it’s being lied to. It’s disrespectful, insulting. My tolerance for bullshit and everyday annoyances is higher than most, and keeping my mouth shut when something bothers me is what I do best, but being lied to drives me insane.

It’s like they think I’m stupid. Or unworthy of the truth.