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The Turn of the Key by Ruth Ware Read Online (FREE)

The Turn of the Key by Ruth Ware

Read The Turn of the Key by Ruth Ware full novel online for free here.

3rd September 2017

 

 

Dear Mr. Wrexham,

I know you don’t know me but please, please, please you have to help me

 

 

3rd September 2017

 

 

HMP Charnworth

 

 

Dear Mr. Wrexham,

You don’t know me, but you may have seen coverage of my case in the newspapers. The reason I am writing to you is to ask you please

 

 

4th September 2017

 

 

HMP Charnworth

 

 

Dear Mr. Wrexham,

I hope that’s the right way to address you. I have never written to a barrister before.

The first thing I have to say is that I know this is unconventional. I know I should have gone via my solicitor, but he’s

 

 

5th September 2017

 

 

Dear Mr. Wrexham,

Are you a father? An uncle? If so, let me appeal

 

 

Dear Mr. Wrexham,

Please help me. I didn’t kill anyone.

 

 

7th September 2017

 

 

HMP Charnworth

 

 

Dear Mr. Wrexham,

You have no idea how many times I’ve started this letter and screwed up the resulting mess, but I’ve realized there is no magic formula here. There is no way I can make you listen to my case. So I’m just going to have to do my best to set things out. However long it takes, however much I mess this up, I’m just going to keep going and tell the truth.

My name is . . . And here I stop, wanting to tear up the page again.

Because if I tell you my name, you will know why I am writing to you. My case has been all over the papers, my name in every headline, my agonized face staring out of every front page—and every single article insinuating my guilt in a way that falls only just short of contempt of court. If I tell you my name, I have a horrible feeling you might write me off as a lost cause and throw my letter away. I wouldn’t entirely blame you, but please—before you do that, hear me out.

I am a young woman, twenty-seven years old, and as you’ll have seen from the return address above, I am currently at the Scottish women’s prison HMP Charnworth. I’ve never received a letter from anyone in prison, so I don’t know what they look like when they come through the door, but I imagine my current living arrangements were pretty obvious even before you opened the envelope.

What you probably don’t know is that I’m on remand.

And what you cannot know is that I’m innocent.

I know, I know. They all say that. Every single person I’ve met here is innocent—according to them, anyway. But in my case it’s true.

You may have guessed what’s coming next. I’m writing to ask you to represent me as my solicitor advocate at my trial.

I realize that this is unconventional and not how defendants are supposed to approach advocates. (I accidentally called you a barrister in an earlier draft of this letter—I know nothing about the law, and even less about the Scottish system. Everything I do know I have picked up from the women I’m in prison with, including your name.)